It has been a tremendous privilege writing the biography of Juliette Gordon Low. I have enjoyed every minute of the time I’ve spent talking with people about the Founder of the Girl Scouts of the USA. I am really looking forward to the publication of the paperback a few days from now and to the paperback book tour which will follow in early February. I hope my biography has helped Girl Scouts and non-Girl Scouts learn more about the contours of Daisy Low’s interesting life and how she and her organization fit into the larger tapestry of U.S. history.

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Dear Blog Readers–

Thanks to the kindness of Juliette Gordon Low’s great-niece, Margaret M. Seiler, I can make available to you this marvelous photograph of taken at the White House when Juliette  Gordon Low was awarded the Medal of Freedom on May 29, 2012.

On the left is Anna Maria Chavez, CEO of the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. To the right of President Obama are Richard Platt (Juliette’s great-nephew), Margaret M. Seiler (Juliette’s great-niece), Audrey Platt (Richard’s wife) and Connie Lindsey, Chair of the National Board of Directors of the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. With them are five really lucky girls!

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Marian Corbin Aslakson knew Juliette Gordon Low. She was just a girl, but she was “at the right place and the right time,” when “Miss Daisy,” as Marian called her, returned to Savannah in 1912, zealous about spreading the new Girl Guiding movement that had begun so auspiciously in Great Britain. Marian Corbin was a student at the school operated by Juliette’s cousin Nina Pape. And when Juliette asked Nina for willing volunteers for the first Girl Guide troops in the United States, Marian stepped forward.

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I am coming to the end of this blog–just about one month now until the paperback of Juliette Gordon Low: The Remarkable Founder of the Girl Scouts appears in book stores near you, at which time I’ll wind down the blog writing. And in sorting out the research boxes for this project, I came upon a brief note from the National Historic Preservation Center in the Girl Scouts of the USA national headquarters in New York. It was entitled “Extracts from a letter written by Mrs. Dance, who lived at Wellesbourne House when a girl,” and contained this interesting bit:

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One hundred and twenty six years ago today–21 December 1886–Juliette “Daisy” Gordon married William M. Low in Savannah, Georgia. Her parents hosted the event–and while this is still a common role for parents today, in the nineteenth century such entertaining entailed duties that we don’t think about having to do anymore. Daisy’s mother, Nellie Kinzie Gordon, wrote a long letter to her Cousin Laura describing Daisy’s nuptials–the chores, the company, and an extremely important tidbit about the wedding rice. It is a wonderful historical document because of the terrific details. It is easy to imagine the hustle and bustle in the Gordon home (especially if you have been to Savannah to visit it). And the perspective of the mother of the bride is always entertaining.

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